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Emergency Tips And Repair Options For A Child’s Chipped Tooth

Posted by on Aug 12, 2015 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Emergency Tips And Repair Options For A Child’s Chipped Tooth

Children will get into scrapes, but these scrapes can leave you with a sinking feeling when you see a chipped tooth in a formerly perfect smile. This is especially true when the tooth in question is an adult tooth. This guide can help you navigate the process of restorative dentistry. First Steps Check out your child’s mouth as soon as the accident occurs. Make sure that the broken tooth hasn’t caused any major lacerations, since these may require immediate stitches in the emergency room. If the injury appears limited to just the broken tooth, contact your dentist to schedule an emergency appointment. Run your finger over the edge of the tooth. If it’s rough, give your child a piece of sugarless gum to chew and then instruct them to spread it over the rough edge so they don’t cut their tongue. If you find the tooth fragment, place it in a cup of milk to take to the dentist office. Treatment Options The type of repair necessary and available depends on the damage. The following are a few of the options the dentist may recommend: Smoothing. For a minor chip, your dentist may just recommend smoothing the rough surface. If the chip is minor enough, your child may never need any further repairs, especially if the tooth isn’t a highly visible front tooth. Glue repair. This repair is done when you have the tooth chips with you and they are fairly large. The dentist reattaches the chips to the tooth with a special dental glue, effectively rebuilding the damaged tooth. Bonding. A small but noticeable chip in the enamel can sometimes be hidden with a porcelain filling that matches the color of the tooth. This is a simple yet durable repair choice. The tooth surface is roughened and then the material is bonded to the damaged area. Crown. This is usually necessary if the root is exposed, which is a painful condition for your child. Your child may first be given a temporary crown, which isn’t a tight fit, so it’s best to eat only soft foods and not to chew with that tooth. Once the permanent crown is made, usually within a week or two, it is custom fit to the tooth. Veneers. These are used when one of the front teeth has a noticeable but painless chip. The veneer is bonded over the tooth surface to permanently hide the damage. The option your dentist recommends depends on the type of chip and the age of your child. For example, temporary crowns can come off easily, so your dentist may opt to use a temporary filling instead on a younger child that may choke on the crown....

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Non-Verbal Dental Emergency Cues

Posted by on Jul 28, 2015 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Non-Verbal Dental Emergency Cues

For those who don’t or can’t verbalize, getting someone to understand where the pain is can be quite a trial. As the parent or loved one of someone who is non-verbal, it’s important that you understand the signs that there is dental pain to be dealt with. Otherwise, it could go on longer than it needs to and end up causing more health problems than if it were taken care of immediately. Here, you can learn some of the non-verbal cues that can help you see when emergency dental care might be required. Change in Eating Habits If someone has a pain in their mouth, they aren’t going to eat as much as they normally would or they are going to select different things than usual. Look for your loved one to avoid eating or to choose only soft foods. Older children might even want something that doesn’t have sugar in it if they understand that the sugar may cause a cavity to hurt worse. Wincing When Using Mouth If you’ve ever had a toothache, you know that sometimes all it takes is to accidentally touch that tooth whether you are talking, eating, or anything else. All of a sudden, a sharp pain hits and there is nothing you can do but wince. If you see a loved one do this, it could be a sign that they have a toothache or some other tender area in their mouth. Tugging at Ears Sometimes people tug at their ears when they have dental pain, especially when they are laying down at night. It isn’t that there is a problem with the ear itself. It’s just that sometimes the swelling can put pressure on the inner workings of the ear just because it is so close to the mouth. This frequently happens at night simply because that’s when people lay down and gravity causes the infection and swelling to go to the lowest spot, which is very close to the ear. Other signs that there may be a dental emergency would include a swollen face and sometimes even nasal problems. Keep in mind that the roots of the teeth are very close to some nasal cavities, so when they swell, it can cause nasal discomfort. If you see any of these signs, call a dental professional or company like Children’s Dentistry of Lake County to schedule an appointment and learn what you can do to help ease the pain of your loved one.    ...

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3 On-The-Go Tips For Denture Care

Posted by on Jul 9, 2015 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on 3 On-The-Go Tips For Denture Care

You want to keep your dentures in good shape when you have travel plans. Taking care of your dentures is very important because they help you to communicate and eat effectively. You do not want to be stuck in a bind when you are away from home, as you probably won’t have time to make it to the denturist in your travels. Luckily, it is very easy to factor in denture care when you are preparing for your trip and while you are on the road as well. Here are three on-the-go tips for denture care. Carry your own upperware to soak your dentures in. Many hotels provide glassware; however, the cleanliness of the glassware can be hit-or-miss. According to a report by ABC News, many hotels are not sanitized properly; it can be hard to tell if they have been properly cleaned, and you face a dilemma when trying to use hotel towels as well. You can avoid using dirty dishware by bringing your own Tupperware. This cuts down your chances of using an unsanitary glass that can transfer germs and contagions to your dentures. You can rest easy knowing that your dentures are being soaked in a clean container. Buy a spare toothbrush to use on the road. Many dentists recommend cleaning your dentures with a specially designed toothbrush with soft bristles. Leave your main toothbrush at home and purchase a spare for when you are on the road. You do not need to worry about replacing your primary toothbrush in case you lose it in your travels. If you can find a travel-sized denture toothbrush, that is even better. Whenever possible. you should brush your dentures after meals in order to reduce food particles on your dentures and gums that can bind with bacteria to form plaque. Drink plenty of water with your meals. If you do not have a toothbrush on hand, you should make sure that you rinse your dentures and rinse out your mouth to keep your gums healthy. You can do a kind of pre-rinse of your dentures and gums by drinking plenty of water with your meals. This helps to loosen up and wash away food residues that are left behind. If you are pressed for time and cannot rinse your dentures in a private area, then you should drink a glass of water after your meal as well. Although this does not complete the job of cleaning your dentures, it certainly helps. To learn more, contact a denture clinic like The Denture...

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Avoiding The Pennsatuckey Effect: Two Tips To Help You Maintain A Beautiful Smile

Posted by on Jun 17, 2015 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Avoiding The Pennsatuckey Effect: Two Tips To Help You Maintain A Beautiful Smile

If you’re a fan of the wildly popular series known as “Orange Is The New Black,” you are undoubtedly familiar with one of the most controversial characters on the show:  Pennsatucky.  A standout feature that makes Pennsatucky (played by actress Taryn Manning) such a notable part of the show are her teeth.  Pennsatucky’s oral cavity is dotted with just a few teeth, with the remaining part of her gums appearing black and brown.  If you want to keep your teeth from looking as horrible as Pennsatucky, use this information to learn more about maintenance tips that can keep your smile looking amazing. Stay Away From Drugs And Cigarettes, And Limit Your Alcohol Consumption Although you may believe that the only threats to good oral health concern food, you are mistaken. Indulging in drugs and cigarettes, and overdoing it with alcohol can wreak havoc on your teeth, causing them to look just as bad as Pennsatucky’s, who is a former drug addict. Cigarettes and drugs affect the teeth in many different ways.  The nicotine and tar that is found in cigarettes can stain and discolor the teeth, while the acidic nature of drugs such as methamphetaphine can strip the teeth of enamel and cause premature deterioration. Alcohol damages your teeth because it changes the environment inside of your mouth.  Alcohol dries up the saliva, which can soften the enamel on your teeth.  If you find that you overindulge in alcohol, you’ll want to brush your teeth for at least 20 minutes to remineralize your tooth enamel. Maintain A Balanced Diet One reason why Pennsatucky has such bad teeth is because she is a woman of limited means who eats a poor diet. Consuming diets rich in processed sugars can be gruesome for the teeth, and if allowed to progress, could lead to irreversible damage that you’ll need a skilled dentists to repair. Consuming a diet that is rich in crunchy vegetables is a great way for you to keep your teeth clean in a natural way. Foods like carrots, celery, apples, and cucumbers literally scrub your teeth with every bite, removing plaque and keeping the surface of your teeth free of plaque so you can avoid the kind of deterioration that Pennsatucky suffered from. Pennsatucky’s oral status should serve as a cautionary tale that prompts you to take better care of your teeth. You don’t have to experience the Pennsatucky effect; start using these tips right away so you can enjoy a beautiful smile for as long as possible. For more information, contact your dentist (such as Picone Dental – Vincent J Picone...

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Porcelain And Composite Veneers: The Key To A Better Smile

Posted by on Jun 1, 2015 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Porcelain And Composite Veneers: The Key To A Better Smile

The idea of having dental work done can often seem unsavory or scary. However, if you suffer from tooth sensitivity or are dissatisfied with the appearance of your teeth, then you should consider dental veneers. This mostly-cosmetic procedure offers a multitude of benefits while being painless and simple. What are dental veneers? A veneer is a thin layer of material that is placed on top of the tooth. It can serve as either an aesthetic or protective element, depending on the type of veneer that you get. There are also two main materials that dental veneers are made out of: porcelain and composite. So what’s the difference between porcelain and composite? Porcelain veneers are quite a bit more durable and natural-looking than composite veneers. They will last at least a decade, and are quite resistant to stains. This ultimately means that porcelain veneers are the best choice if you want a long-lasting option that will protect your teeth to the fullest. So what’s the catch? Unfortunately, this comes at a cost to both your bank account and your convenience. Getting porcelain veneers installed can take several visits, since they aren’t immediately installed into your mouth like composites. In order to get the perfect fit for your porcelain veneers, you will first need to go to the dentist to get measured, and then will need to return after the veneers have been crafted to specification. On the other hand, composites can be made and fitted into your mouth on the very same visit. In general, porcelain veneers will be significantly more expensive than composite veneers due to a variety of factors. Porcelain veneers require a specialized lab to create the veneers while composites can be made on the spot by most dentists. Porcelain veneers also require a more expensive material than composites, which are generally made from the same resin that is used for fillings and treating cavities. So which option is best? If you’re on a budget, in a hurry, or if you plan on getting a more expensive set of veneers later in life, then you’ll probably want to opt for the composite veneers. However, if you can take the initial strain on your wallet, you are better off going for the porcelain. Both options are excellent for improving the color and shape of your teeth, as well as preventing decay, so the only thing you really need to worry about is durability and longevity. Contact a dental professional like one from The Center For Progressive Dentistry for more...

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How Long Do Dental Implants Last?

Posted by on May 11, 2015 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Often, when the subject of dental implants arises, one of the first questions to come up is about their expected lifespan. Having these placed is a considerable procedure, and while it can have truly incredible benefits for those with missing and/or heavily damaged teeth, the last thing you want is to have the problem recur time and time again. Implants are designed to last a lifetime, and with proper care and attention they often will. However, issues with your implants are always possible, and certain behaviors and habits can increase the likelihood of trouble. Why Do Some Implants Fail? Dental implants can be anchored in, under, or on top of the jawbone – but in any event, they do require a healthy, stable support base of bone and other tissues. Poor oral hygiene, especially around the implant region, will invite disease and even bone loss. Even a perfect implantation procedure by an expert dentist can fail if patients don’t take care of their mouths in the long term. Ordinarily, teeth contain a central blood vessel, through which nutrients and disease-fighting white blood cells can reach nearby tissues. Since implants lack this blood vessel, the gums surrounding the implant site become more vulnerable to periodontitis and other conditions that threaten oral health. Over time, this may not only degrade the bone on which your implant sits: it can also cause further tooth loss and even heart attacks or strokes. How To Keep Your Implants Healthy It’s clear that periodontal disease is a big problem for patients with implants, but fortunately, it’s usually avoidable. Maintaining good oral hygiene becomes more crucial than ever once you’ve been fitted with an implant. In addition to brushing and flossing daily, it’s important that you receive regular dental checkups and professional cleanings. If you smoke cigarettes or cigars, there’s never been a better time to stop. The crowns atop your implants, too, are vulnerable to damage over time. Wear and tear is only natural, and your crowns may have a limited working lifespan (every situation is different, but you can often expect at least 10 years). That said, you can prevent discoloration with careful daily cleaning, and limit the effects of wearing by taking care not to grind your teeth. Crowns are, fortunately, not at risk of developing cavities – and are rather easy to replace if needed, so long as the implant and underlying bone remain healthy. To learn more about dental implants contact a dental office like Dental Services Of...

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Oral Health: Steps To Take After You Eat A Sweet Treat

Posted by on Apr 17, 2015 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Denying your sweet-tooth can be hard, but there are a few things you can do after you have a sweet treat to keep it from harming your teeth. The following guide may help reduce the likelihood of a dental-related issue due to your sugar-intake. Cavities and Sugar Sugar does not cause cavities on its own. The truth is, harmful bacteria in your mouth need to feed, and sugar is a source of food. The bacteria eat up the sugar and use it to make your mouth acidic. Oral pathogens flourish in acidic environments. The bacteria in your mouth use their bacterial acid to destroy your enamel and eat your dentin away. This is how oral pathogens create cavities and how sugar is involved. Consider These Tips After You Have a Sweet Treat Thoroughly rinse your mouth out with mouthwash or plain water. This should help lift candy residue, which bacteria feed on. Remember that you will be making your mouth antibacterial if you rinse your teeth with alkaline water. Alkaline water rebalances your pH value, reducing the chances of bacteria to even feed. Chew a piece of xylitol or sugarless gum. Xylitol is a type of sweetener that oral pathogens cannot consume, which should help reduce their numbers. Chewing gum should loosen up any residue stuck on your teeth or in between your teeth. Chewing also activates your salivary glands, and saliva helps keep your mouth unfriendly to bacteria. Chew on an apple after you finish your treat. The natural crunchiness of apples should help lift some residue off of your teeth. Apples also contain malic acid, which is an active ingredient that is naturally astringent. Malic acid inhibits the formation of bacterial biofilms. Biofilms are sticky layers that bacteria use to latch themselves to your teeth. Wait to brush your teeth. Brushing your teeth is one of the last things you want to do, simply because brushing your teeth might smear the residue around. You might even lodge candy particles deeper into your teeth. You want to brush after you have chewed some gum or done a rinse. You can also use this time to floss.  As you can see, there are ways you can protect your teeth after indulging in something sweet. This does not mean that you should overindulge; oral pathogens may still find a way to use your sugar cravings. Remember that any pain, or even bad breath, could be an indication of a cavity, so don’t forget those dentist appointments. For more information and tips, talk to the dentist at a local clinic like Medin Family...

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Braces In Adulthood: Is It Right For You?

Posted by on Mar 31, 2015 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

For most people, braces are something they get in their childhood or even teenage years, not when they are adults. However, some adults may find that later in life, they need the help of braces to keep their teeth properly aligned. Before you decide if braces are right for you when you are older, think about the different factors that can influence this big decision.  Availability and Cost If your current dentist has deemed you a candidate for braces, it might be a good idea to get a second opinion. Sometimes, braces seem like the easiest way to get teeth straight, but you may have other options available to you since you’re an adult. Braces can cost anywhere from two to three thousand dollars to upwards of almost ten thousand dollars, depending on the type you receive. If your dental insurance does not cover the cost of braces for adults, you might be left footing the bill, but there are some plans that may cover part of the cost.  Questions to Ask Before you decide if braces are right for you, there are several questions you should ask your orthodontist. Here are some things you should find out before determining if braces will be the best option: Will the braces alter my facial profile in any way? Will I need to have any teeth removed before the braces can be put in? Are there other options available to me, such as “invisible” style braces rather than metal? Are rubber bands going to be required in addition to the braces? How long will I need to wear the braces? How often will I need to come in for adjustments, and how much will each adjustment session cost? Is any other form of surgery needed? Will there be any pain or any other discomfort involved with the new braces? Is this process going to improve my bite or simply realign my teeth? If You Do Get Braces If you decide that braces are the best route for you, be prepared to deal with a few different things. Initially, you may feel a bit of discomfort after the braces have been put on, but this should subside within a week or two. You will also need to be especially aware of the need for extra brushing, flossing, and removing any food particles from between your braces. Make a dental kit to bring with you to work or while travelling so you can address any annoying food pieces or other irritants that might get stuck in them. Even though you might feel a bit self-conscious about having braces as an adult, remember that it is only temporary and the beautiful straight smile you will have when they come off will be well worth...

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Beyond The Teeth: 2 Non-Dental Disorders Orthodontists Can Treat

Posted by on Mar 13, 2015 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

As most everybody knows, an orthodontist is the type of dentist responsible for putting on braces. But what you may not know is that an orthodontist can help to treat more than just crooked teeth. If you would like to learn more about the role of orthodontics in health, read on. This article will present two disorders an orthodontist can help treat. Sleep Apnea Sleep apnea is a type of sleeping disorder characterized by shallow, infrequent, or paused breathing. It causes the level of carbon dioxide in the blood to rise. This in turn causes the sleep to wake up in order to begin breathing correctly. As a result, one of the main symptoms of sleep apnea is excessive daytime sleepiness.  Orthodontists can help treat sleep apnea through the implementation of special oral devices. Also known as oral appliances, this type of device works by pushing the jaw and tongue forward, thus improving airflow by increasing the size of the airway. In addition, the use of such devices reduces the likelihood of airway tissue collapsing and cutting off breathing when you inhale. One of the most commonly prescribed oral devices is known as the mandibular repositioning device, or MRD. This device fits inside of the mouth, where it helps to keep the airways open while you sleep. To be effective and safe, an MRD must be fit for your mouth by an orthodontist with experience working with these devices.  Speech Impediments Dental malocclusion is the technical name for teeth that are crooked and/or don’t fit together correctly. While in most cases this remains more of a cosmetic issue, extreme malocclusion may lead to a number of disorders, including speech impediments. Because malocclusion causes the mouth to be misaligned, it increases the difficulty of pronouncing certain sounds–especially the letters d, n, and t. These sounds are more challenging to make because they require a very specific placement of the tongue inside the mouth, and for individuals with misaligned teeth this can be a difficult task. Yet when crooked teeth are straightened by means of orthodontics, the tongue once again has the room that it needs to form more complex sounds. Over time, the improper tongue placements caused by misaligned teeth will become habitual, making them much more difficult to correct. Therefore, the sooner a speech impediment can be addressed through orthodontics, the better. In fact, it is generally agreed that regular orthodontic checkups (from specialists such as those from Wright Center For Orthodontics) should begin as early as seven years old, in order to prevent serious problems from...

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How To Handle Common Dental Emergencies

Posted by on Dec 16, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Dental emergencies, such as a severe toothache or broken crown, tend to happen at the most inopportune time. While the ideal thing to do is call your dentist, this might not always be possible. Many dental emergencies occur late at night, during the weekend, or while on vacation. If you can’t get to a dentist right away, follow these tips for handling different types of dental emergencies. Toothache In most cases, a toothache is not a dental emergency that requires urgent treatment. You can take a pain relief medication, but do not put it directly onto the gum, as this burns the sensitive tissue. Rinse your mouth out with warm water and floss around the tooth to remove food particles. Many times, this is what is causing the pain. If it still hurts, take your pain relief medications and get to the dentist, as soon as you can. Post-Surgical Infection If the pain you are experiencing is severe, it is not just a toothache and might be due to an infection. A good way to tell between an infection and toothache is that it feels like multiple teeth are hurting at the same time. This may be in one area, or all around your mouth. Other signs of infection include having a fever, having an odd taste in your mouth, a swollen mouth or swollen cheeks, and tender lymph nodes. If you have recently have a procedure, such as getting dental implants, an infection is considered a medical emergency. Go to your nearby hospital if your dentist is not available, such as through http://www.couchmandental.com. Broken Tooth or Crown When a tooth or crown breaks, it is important that you keep the area clean. After contacting your dentist, rinse the area with warm water. You need to keep this area clean to prevent infection. For pain, you can take an anti-inflammatory medication and use a cold compress on the area to reduce swelling. If the crown popped off but still fits over your tooth, use dental cement or toothpaste to adhere it temporarily to the tooth until you get into the dentist. Broken Braces If you have a metal bracket or wire that has broken or come loose, it may stick out and cut your cheek, gums, or tongue. When there is a sharp edge, try sticking something to the end of it temporarily, such as a cotton ball, gauze, or orthodontic wax. This will prevent it from injuring you until you can get into your orthodontist to repair it. You may also be able to push the wire slightly out of the way of your cheek by using a pencil eraser. Lost Filling A lost filling is not usually an emergency situation, and you might not even experience pain. However, you will have an open cavity, so you might have some discomfort. If a filling has fallen out, call your dentist, and then use a temporary solution to fill the cavity. You can use dental cement purchased at your local drug store, or put a piece of sugarless gum in the cavity. Never use gum with...

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